Q&A Presents: Maui Online! – Saturday, July 23rd – Part 1

Jonathan Show Archives

Maui Science Center Winter in July Event! Today we’ll be talking about the Winter Wonderland next week with the Maui Science Center! Rimma Murta joins us along with Dr. Armstrong! And, we’ll talking about the weather! Yes, we might have gotten missed by Darby, but everytime a storm (or worse) comes around, people rush around to do things they should’ve already been ready for. Does your computer have a disaster plan? If you’re ready for hour two, listen by clicking here!

Q&A Presents: Maui Online! – Saturday, July 23rd – Part 2

Jonathan Show Archives

Disaster Preparedness, and more Maui Science Center Today we’ll be talking about the Winter Wonderland next week with the Maui Science Center! Rimma Murta joins us along with Dr. Armstrong! And, we’ll talking about the weather! Yes, we might have gotten missed by Darby, but everytime a storm (or worse) comes around, people rush around to do things they should’ve already been ready for. Does your computer have a disaster plan? Did you miss the first hour? Listen in by clicking here!

Astronomical binge reading!

Sam News

Did today’s show leave you hungry for more starry stories and celestial tales? Do you have an appetite for things beyond the sight of the naked eye? When you look up, do you wish you could be doing it with the insights of the world’s astronomy community along with you?  Well, you’re in luck! http://www.ifa.hawaii.edu/info/press-releases/alpha_centauri/ http://www.slate.com/blogs/bad_astronomy/2015/10/14/weird_star_strange_dips_in_brightness_are_a_bit_baffling.html http://www.astronomy.com/news/2015/10/hubbles-planetary-portrait-captures-new-changes-in-jupiters-great-red-spot http://www.astronomy.com/news/2015/10/vla-reveals-spectacular-halos-of-spiral-galaxies http://phys.org/news/2015-10-robotic-laser-astronomy.html http://www.sci-news.com/astronomy/science-eso-coalsack-nebula-03338.html http://www.astronomy.com/news/2015/10/hubbles-planetary-portrait-captures-new-changes-in-jupiters-great-red-spot

Q&A Presents: Maui Online! – Saturday, October 17th – Part 1

Jonathan Show Archives

Astronomical Stuff with Dr. Armstrong! – Part 1 Since its activation in 2009, the Kepler Space Telescope has been scanning the cosmos in search of habitable worlds beyond our Solar System. Kepler observed the star KIC 8462852 for four years starting in 2009. Typically, orbiting planets only dim the light of their host star for a period of a few hours to a few days depending on their orbit. A group of citizen scientists noticed that this star appeared to have two small dips in 2009, followed by a large dip lasting almost a week in 2011, and finally a series of multiple dips significantly dimming the star’s light in 2013. Hmmm. That’s funny… The pattern of dips indicates that the star is orbited by a large, irregular-shaped mass. If it were orbiting a young star, this mass might be a protoplanetary disc, but KIC 8462852 is not a young star. We would also expect to see the presence of dust emitting infrared light, which hasn’t been observed. So what is this orbiting mass? We don’t know. But we have some ideas… ideas that may make you go Hmmmm… So join Jonathan, Sam, and L.D. along with special guest Dr. J.D. Armstrong from the Maui Institute for Astronomy as we ponder the possibilities…

Q&A Presents: Maui Online! – Saturday, October 17th – Part 2

Jonathan Show Archives

Astronomical Stuff with Dr. Armstrong! – Part 2 Since its activation in 2009, the Kepler Space Telescope has been scanning the cosmos in search of habitable worlds beyond our Solar System. Kepler observed the star KIC 8462852 for four years starting in 2009. Typically, orbiting planets only dim the light of their host star for a period of a few hours to a few days depending on their orbit. A group of citizen scientists noticed that this star appeared to have two small dips in 2009, followed by a large dip lasting almost a week in 2011, and finally a series of multiple dips significantly dimming the star’s light in 2013. Hmmm. That’s funny… The pattern of dips indicates that the star is orbited by a large, irregular-shaped mass. If it were orbiting a young star, this mass might be a protoplanetary disc, but KIC 8462852 is not a young star. We would also expect to see the presence of dust emitting infrared light, which hasn’t been observed. So what is this orbiting mass? We don’t know. But we have some ideas… ideas that may make you go Hmmmm… So join Jonathan, Sam, and L.D. along with special guest Dr. J.D. Armstrong from the Maui Institute for Astronomy as we ponder the possibilities…